Sometimes it’s ok to walk off the court in China.

Thursday, August 18, 2011 20:41
Posted in category The Big Picture

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=waQlUVtFvWs[/youtube]

Watching the recent footage of the recent fight that broke out during an exhibition game between the Georgetown Hoyas and Bayi Rockets, I am reminded of the fact that sometimes it is okay to walk off the court and to not look back… and while it may be a stretch to draw a “doing business in China” analogy, I am going to anyway.

Because in my time here, I have seen firms do whatever it took to get into the market, and to keep their Chinese side happy. Even when it was against their direct interest to do so, when chairs were being thrown at their heads, and 6-8 from the other side were jumping on the head of a single manager.

Codes of Conduct would be set aside. … IP concessions would be made…. Abusive supplier relationships would be doubled up. .. Marketing funds tripled….  All because of a fear of “losing an opportunity”….  For the good of the “relationship”..  that is it CHINA.

That, it is at times like these (where firms who are having chairs thrown at them), that management needs to stop, take stock of the situation, re-analyze whether “China” is really worth the shots to the head.

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One Response to “Sometimes it’s ok to walk off the court in China.”

  1. Chris Devonshire-Ellis says:

    August 19th, 2011 at 12:37 am

    True. China hasn’t yet woken up to the fact that alternative destinations for FDI and for buying product from are creeping up, not least India and Vietnam. The “China Plus One” strategy may get a boost if this sort of anti-social behavior catches on, and its not the first time a Chinese team has kicked off in a friendly match against foreigtners. It’s hardly indicative of a sense of fair play, and more suggestive of a “win at all costs” mentality creeping in amongst China’s youth. That’s not realistic nor desirable. If you can’t learn to play together then anything more substantial is going to be pushed on the back burner. – Chris